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Amistad Staff Study Blog

Sep 19
Our book for 2014/2015 school Year

Have you started reading the book yet?

Quote from the book:

Most schools teaching kids from poverty do underperform, and those accountable often make excuses about "those kids." But kids who get wraparound support are able to stop dwelling on their problems and limitations and to start focusing on the educational opportunities available to them. Until your school finds ways to address the social, emotional, and health-related challenges that your kids face ever day, academic excellence is just a politically correct but highly unlikely goal.​   (Pg 69-70)

We can do this!!!  (I know, I say that a lot.)

How are we already doing this and where/what more can we do?​

Comments

Hello everyone!!!  Is this ...

Hello everyone!!!  Is this thing on??
Picture Placeholder: Andy Woehler
  • Andy Woehler
 on 10/8/2014 1:13 PM

I think there are many thin...

I think there are many things we do to help our students achieve academic success such as: Holding the standard high, Century 21, After School Program, activities that ATP organize to help bring the family and school together to name a few. But some of the things that aren't maybe so obvious are pieces of information such as the concept of allostatic load and how we can play a part in relieving stress at school and recognizing and acknowledging when the student is working hard and persisting.  We can practice hope building, and using techniques that support students learning through active engagement and discussion.  I agree with Mr. Jensen that hope is very important.  If you don't have hope for the future, then what do you have?
Picture Placeholder: Suzanne Curn
  • Suzanne Curn
 on 10/22/2014 7:31 PM

Allostatic load - unmediate...

Allostatic load - unmediated stress or "carryover" stress as defined by our book on pg 26.

Great point Suzanne!
Picture Placeholder: Andy Woehler
  • Andy Woehler
 on 10/24/2014 12:32 PM

I have been reviewing some ...

I have been reviewing some notes from a class I took this summer from Eric Jensen.  A point that stood out to me ( in light of all the diagnosis of some form of Autism) is that we might want to be careful about pushing that handicapping condition for our students.  According to Eric Jensen's research: two common things that exist for these children in poverty are stress and low executive function skills.  Low executive function skills are also very common among autistic children. I'm not saying that it isn't possible but the more you read his "stuff" the more I'm inclined to think we need to be careful.
Picture Placeholder: Suzanne Curn
  • Suzanne Curn
 on 1/18/2015 4:58 PM

I have been reviewing some ...

I have been reviewing some notes from a class I took this summer from Eric Jensen.  A point that stood out to me ( in light of all the diagnosis of some form of Autism) is that we might want to be careful about pushing that handicapping condition for our students.  According to Eric Jensen's research: two common things that exist for these children in poverty are stress and low executive function skills.  Low executive function skills are also common among autistic children. I'm not saying that it isn't possible but the more you read his "stuff" the more I'm inclined to think we need to be careful.
Picture Placeholder: Suzanne Curn
  • Suzanne Curn
 on 1/18/2015 4:58 PM

I would give that task to o...

I would give that task to out START team for some help there.  Having this team carefully monitoring students will be key.
Picture Placeholder: Andy Woehler
  • Andy Woehler
 on 1/26/2015 7:57 PM